Tag Archives: Words

WordPress Wednesday- Warp and Weft

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Warp and Weft are commonly used terms amongst my crafty friends but maybe they are words that other, none crafters, may not know. 

Warp and weft in plain weaving
In weaving cloth, the warp is the set of lengthwise yarns that are held in tension on a frame or loom. The yarn that is inserted over-and-under the warp threads is called the weft, woof, or filler. Each individual warp thread in a fabric is called a warp end or end. Warp means “that which is thrown across” (Old English wearp, from weorpan, to throw, cf. German werfen, Dutch werpen).

Very simple looms use a spiral warp, in which a single, very long yarn is wound around a pair of sticks or beams in a spiral pattern to make up the warp.

Because the warp is held under high tension during the entire process of weaving and warp yarn must be strong, yarn for warp ends is usually spun and plied fibre. Traditional fibres for warping are wool, linen, alpaca, and silk. With the improvements in spinning technology during the Industrial Revolution, it became possible to make cotton yarn of sufficient strength to be used as the warp in mechanized weaving. Later, artificial or man-made fibres such as nylon or rayon were employed.

While most people are familiar with weft-faced weavings, it is possible to create warp-faced weavings using densely arranged warp threads. In warp-faced weavings, the design for the textile is in the warp, and so all colours must be decided upon and placed during the first part of the weaving process and cannot be changed. Warp-faced weavings are defined by length-wise stripes and vertical designs due to the limitations of color placement. Many South American cultures, including the ancient Incas and Aymaras used a type of warp-faced weaving called Backstrap Weaving, which uses the weight of the weaver’s body to control the tension of the loom.

Mary Kurtz Sewing Quote

Something to make you smile😃

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Wordsmith Wednesday- Ombré

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Ombre – currently a favourite word with myself. Ombré reminds me of the sights and colours of the Italian buildings that I have recently been admiring. Shades blending from cream to orange to terracotta, beautiful.

Ombré describes the gradual blending of one color hue to another, usually moving tints and shades from light to dark. The technique is commonly seen as a surface treatment in fashion and art. During the early 21st century ombré became a popular feature for hair coloring, nail art, and even baking, in addition to its uses in home decorating and graphic design.image

Wordsmith Wednesday

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word·smith
n. 
1. A fluent and prolific writer, especially one who writes professionally.
2. An expert on words.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Until I retired I worked in a busy Radiology/imaging department. Many “words” passed through this office and it was an unwritten rule that if we had to ask how to spell a word, we were to look it up in a dictionary. This meant that not only did we spell it correctly but we qualified the definition. We therefore improved our vocabulary and spelling. This is one thing that I miss from work. I decided that every Wednesday we would investigate a “new” word.

There are no real rules regarding “Wordsmith Wednesday” except

1) The word must be interesting, uncommon, or unusual.

2) I will check both the definition and the spelling

3) There are no rules!

Dont forget to visit next Wordsmith Wednesday next Wednesday!👍