Tag Archives: Wednesday

Wordsmith Wednesday – crochet

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Crochet is a process of creating fabric by interlocking loops of yarn, thread, or strands of other materials using a crochet hook. The name is taken from the French word “crochet”, meaning small hook. These are made of materials such as metal, wood, or plastic and are manufactured commercially and produced in artisan workshops. The salient difference between crochet and knitting, beyond the implements used for their production, is that each stitch in crochet is completed before proceeding with the next one, while knitting keeps a large number of stitches open at a time. (Variant forms such as Tunisian crochet and broomstick lace keep multiple crochet stitches open at a time.)

At Yarndale 2015 last weekend I met dozens of crochet experts. The end products were beautiful including some stunning shawls. I intend to “have a go” but am wary of the Lacey patterns as I always seem to get into trouble with “holes”

I have many pieces of crochet but they are mainly cloths, or doilies. Much too intricate for my patience!

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imageCrocheted shawls

As an aside many of the ladies who crochet call themselves “Hookers” very tongue in cheek!

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Wordsmith Wednesday – Blackberry vs Bramble

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imageThe blackberry is a bramble

In British English, a “bramble” is any rough (usually wild) tangled prickly shrub—specifically the blackberry bush (Rubus fruticosus)—or any hybrid of similar appearance, with thorny stems. Bramble or brambleberry may also refer to the blackberry fruit or products of its fruit (e.g., bramble jelly). The shrub grows abundantly in all parts of the British Isles and harvesting the fruits in late summer and autumn is often considered a favourite pastime. It can also become a nuisance in gardens, sending down its strong suckering roots amongst hedges and shrubs.

Elsewhere, such as in the United States, the term “bramble” also refers to other members of the Rubus genus, which may or may not have prickly stems—notably the raspberry (Rubus idaeus) or its hybrids. The word comes from Germanic bram-bezi.

Bramble bushes have a distinctive growth form. They send up long, arching canes that do not flower or set fruit until the second year of growth. Brambles usually have trifoliate or palmately-compound leaves.

Bramble fruits are aggregate fruits. Each small unit is called a drupelet. In some, such as the blackberry, the flower receptacle is elongated and part of the ripe fruit, making the blackberry an aggregate-accessory fruit.

Many species are grown and bred for their fruit. Ornamental species can be grown for flowers (e.g. Rubus trilobus), for their ornamental stems (e.g. Rubus cockburnianus) and some as ground cover (e.g. Rubus tricolor). Members of the Rubus genus tend to have a brittle, porous core and an oily residue along the stalk which makes them ideal to burn, even in damp climates. The thorny varieties are sometimes grown for game cover and occasionally for protection.

Most species are important for their conservation and wildlife value in their native range. The flowers attract nectar-feeding butterflies and hoverflies, and are a particular favourite of Volucella pellucens.

Brambles are important food plants for the larvae of several species of Lepidoptera—see list of Lepidoptera that feed on Rubus. The leaves of brambles are often used as a main food source for captive stick insects. Many birds, such as the common blackbird, and some mammals will feed on the nutritious fruits in autumn.

WordPress Wednesday- Warp and Weft

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Warp and Weft are commonly used terms amongst my crafty friends but maybe they are words that other, none crafters, may not know. 

Warp and weft in plain weaving
In weaving cloth, the warp is the set of lengthwise yarns that are held in tension on a frame or loom. The yarn that is inserted over-and-under the warp threads is called the weft, woof, or filler. Each individual warp thread in a fabric is called a warp end or end. Warp means “that which is thrown across” (Old English wearp, from weorpan, to throw, cf. German werfen, Dutch werpen).

Very simple looms use a spiral warp, in which a single, very long yarn is wound around a pair of sticks or beams in a spiral pattern to make up the warp.

Because the warp is held under high tension during the entire process of weaving and warp yarn must be strong, yarn for warp ends is usually spun and plied fibre. Traditional fibres for warping are wool, linen, alpaca, and silk. With the improvements in spinning technology during the Industrial Revolution, it became possible to make cotton yarn of sufficient strength to be used as the warp in mechanized weaving. Later, artificial or man-made fibres such as nylon or rayon were employed.

While most people are familiar with weft-faced weavings, it is possible to create warp-faced weavings using densely arranged warp threads. In warp-faced weavings, the design for the textile is in the warp, and so all colours must be decided upon and placed during the first part of the weaving process and cannot be changed. Warp-faced weavings are defined by length-wise stripes and vertical designs due to the limitations of color placement. Many South American cultures, including the ancient Incas and Aymaras used a type of warp-faced weaving called Backstrap Weaving, which uses the weight of the weaver’s body to control the tension of the loom.

Mary Kurtz Sewing Quote

Something to make you smile😃

Wordsmith Wednesday- Ombré

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Ombre – currently a favourite word with myself. Ombré reminds me of the sights and colours of the Italian buildings that I have recently been admiring. Shades blending from cream to orange to terracotta, beautiful.

Ombré describes the gradual blending of one color hue to another, usually moving tints and shades from light to dark. The technique is commonly seen as a surface treatment in fashion and art. During the early 21st century ombré became a popular feature for hair coloring, nail art, and even baking, in addition to its uses in home decorating and graphic design.image

Wordsmith Wednesday/Abstentious

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Abstentious

PRONUNCIATION:
(abs-TEN-shus)

MEANING:
adjective: Self-restraining, especially in eating or drinking.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin abstinere (to hold back), from ab- (away) + tenere (to hold). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ten- (to stretch), which also gave us tense, tenet, tendon, tent, tenor, tender, pretend, extend, tenure, tetanus, hypotenuse, pertinacious, detente, countenance, distend, extenuate, and tenable. Earliest documented use: 1839.

USAGE:
“Ballplayers … have popped up at water polo, diving, and softball, cheering for Canadian teammates and downing a beer or two, unlike most of their abstentious fellow athletes.”
Ken MacQueen; Now or Never; Maclean’s (Toronto, Canada); Aug 30, 2004.

Interestingly this word contains all the vowels in the correct order!

I think that I might put this word on my fridge door and it might help me to be more abstentious!

Wordsmith Wednesday

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Serendipity
Serendipity means a “fortunate happenstance” or “pleasant surprise”. It was coined by Horace Walpole in 1754. Wikipedia

serendipity has always been my mostest bestest favourite word! I love the way that this word is pronounced. I also adore its meaning : an unexpected, pleasant finding.

You do find shops with this name and I have seen a boat named Serendipity. The reason is in the name!

May you have a serendipitous finding in the near future.

Wordsmith Wednesday

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word·smith
n. 
1. A fluent and prolific writer, especially one who writes professionally.
2. An expert on words.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Until I retired I worked in a busy Radiology/imaging department. Many “words” passed through this office and it was an unwritten rule that if we had to ask how to spell a word, we were to look it up in a dictionary. This meant that not only did we spell it correctly but we qualified the definition. We therefore improved our vocabulary and spelling. This is one thing that I miss from work. I decided that every Wednesday we would investigate a “new” word.

There are no real rules regarding “Wordsmith Wednesday” except

1) The word must be interesting, uncommon, or unusual.

2) I will check both the definition and the spelling

3) There are no rules!

Dont forget to visit next Wordsmith Wednesday next Wednesday!👍

Lush Granny

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As I mentioned previously I attended a Bloggers event at Lush, Chester at the week-end. I met other bloggers, which was great and proved that all those bloggers out there are not just cyber fiction! Lush, Chester pulled out all stops and made the evening great fun. imageKii (posing above) did a great job at demos, commentary and laughter. She is a real Little Miss Dynamite!

One thing that I did notice is that I was (am) DECADES older than all the other bloggers! Not that you can tell from the photo. I had expected this so was not at all put out to be Granny Lush or should I say Lush Granny?

I adore the Lush idea of wrapping a gift in a scarf “Knot-Wrap By Lush” We were given a Knot-Wrap as a gift. I was particularly thrilled with mine as it was very vintage. I now have a fab stash of Lush treats which I will demo at some point. I will wait for a dull, dark, dismal day so that I am cheered up by the wonderful Lush aromas and visual treats for body and sole!

So, for now, it is good bye from the Lush Granny.

Call back tomorrow for a new regular feature called “Wordsmith Wednesday”