Tag Archives: textile

Crafts of India 3

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Whilst my trip to India was a wonderful adventure, I was extremely disappointed to find on arrival in Delhi that the block printing section had been removed from the itinerary ( as were most other people on the tour) The travel company “Colouriscious” had removed that leg of the holiday and no one realised until we arrived in Delhi. The remaining elements of the adventure however, were amazingly good.

We did see a small example of block printing when attending other workshops.

Used blocks covered in Indigo paint.

Cloth printed and partially embroidered. This fabric is destined to become a sari. When the embroidery is complete it will be washed in the river ( Which didn’t look too clean!) and dried in the sun. The washing removes the indigo print and leaves the white embroidery. It will become a beautiful, very white sari.

Bear with me! Only one more Textile Adventure blog to go!

Inspirational Textile Packs

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Friend K and I have spent a few hours putting our ” Textile Inspiration Packs”together for a forthcoming cruise that we are teaching crafts on. We don’t go until mid January next year but I am strapped for time.

All the stress of my own making. Before that particular cruise I have another Caribbean cruise to fit in. Such a hard life! I also have an early alternative Christmas weekend with my girl friends to enjoy before the REAL Christmas. Then there is middle child’s big birthday weekend in a log cabin. Bonfire night party. Further projects to complete for craft cruise and knitting Christmas gift to  finish. A half made crochet blanket for expected new Grandchild phew!

Oh and I will need to post Christmas cards very early and Christmas shop the beginning of December as we don’t return from the Caribbean until 23rd December! Gifts will need wrapped and distributed early.

I also need to complete my departed Mums paper work and formalise her finances. Not to mention sell her house!

I need to make candles and do some fabric printing for a craft fair that I’ve promised to do in November.

Goodness me I’m exhausted just reading this list so maybe I’ll just lie down in a dark room!

I Will tell you more about the Textile Inspiration Packs in the next post ( if I’ve got time!)

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Textile Inspiration Packs

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Whilst we on our recent cruise we produced special Textile Inspiration Packs for our craft group. These packs were put together before we left to join the ship. Each pack contained a mix of textiles including lace, leather, cotton, net, silk or tweed, to name a few. The pieces were vaguely colour co ordinated and each pack also contained a few beads or buttons or ribbon. The packs created great interest and provided a source of much imagination.

imageWe did did not have a great deal of time to craft as we were about to dock in Madeira where there was a flower festival. Because of this I encouraged the ladies to make a flower brooch. The inspiration was all theirs and they certainly used their own imaginations. I suggested that a simple flower was made by cutting discs of reducing size from the various textiles. I provided a template for simplicity. The various discs were then stacked on top of one another and held together with beads or buttons. The edges could be embroidered, frayed or pinked with the shears. After attaching a “finding” to the back it was ready to be worn. Some people fastened them to their bags made in the days before. Others took them home and some attached them to plain tee shirts.

It was a great delight later in the day when we met a lady from the group going ashore. She was wearing the brooch that she had made that morning. Result!!

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These Textile Inspiration Packs were a great success and I will certainly use them again.

Wordsmith Wednesday- Macrame

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Macramé or macrame is a form of textile-making using knotting rather than weaving or knitting. Its primary knots are the square knot and forms of “hitching”: full hitch and double half hitches. It was long crafted by sailors, especially in elaborate or ornamental knotting forms, to decorate anything from knife handles to bottles to parts of ships.

Cavandoli macramé is a variety of macramé used to form geometric patterns and free-form patterns like weaving. The Cavandoli style is done mainly in a single knot, the double half-hitch knot. Reverse half hitches are sometimes used to maintain balance when working left and right halves of a balanced piece.

Leather or fabric belts are another accessory often created via macramé techniques. Most friendship bracelets exchanged among schoolchildren and teens are created using this method. Vendors at theme parks, malls, seasonal fairs and other public places may sell macramé jewelery or decoration as well.

Thank you to Wikipedia for the above

I used to own a macrame plant hanger in the 1970s. It hung from the ceiling and contained a Spider plant- very vintage!imageO
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Wordsmith Wednesday-Twill

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Wordsmith Wednesday is a short weekly blog post that aims to define a word a week. I try to choose a “crafty” or “vintagey” associated word ( I don’t think that vintagey is a real word!) It may broaden your vocabulary or widen your word knowledge, or maybe just fun!

Twill  is a type of textile weave with a pattern of diagonal parallel ribs (in contrast with a satin and plain weave). This is done by passing the weft thread over one or more warp threads and then under two or more warp threads and so on, with a “step” or offset between rows to create the characteristic diagonal pattern. Because of this structure, twills generally drape well.

Examples of twill fabric are denim, tweed, chino, gabardine, drill, covert, and serge.