Tag Archives: lexicon

Wordsmith Wednesday- Macrame

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Macramé or macrame is a form of textile-making using knotting rather than weaving or knitting. Its primary knots are the square knot and forms of “hitching”: full hitch and double half hitches. It was long crafted by sailors, especially in elaborate or ornamental knotting forms, to decorate anything from knife handles to bottles to parts of ships.

Cavandoli macramé is a variety of macramé used to form geometric patterns and free-form patterns like weaving. The Cavandoli style is done mainly in a single knot, the double half-hitch knot. Reverse half hitches are sometimes used to maintain balance when working left and right halves of a balanced piece.

Leather or fabric belts are another accessory often created via macramé techniques. Most friendship bracelets exchanged among schoolchildren and teens are created using this method. Vendors at theme parks, malls, seasonal fairs and other public places may sell macramé jewelery or decoration as well.

Thank you to Wikipedia for the above

I used to own a macrame plant hanger in the 1970s. It hung from the ceiling and contained a Spider plant- very vintage!imageO
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Wordsmith Wednesday – Paraprosdokians

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Paraprosdokians (Winston Churchill loved them) are figures of speech in which the latter part of a sentence or phrase is surprising or unexpected; frequently humorous.

1. Where there’s a will, I want to be in it.

2. The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it’s still on my list.

3. Since light travels faster than sound, some people appear bright until you hear them speak.

4. If I agreed with you, we’d both be wrong.

5. We never really grow up, we only learn how to act in public.

6. War does not determine who is right – only who is left.

7. Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

8. To steal ideas from one person is plagiarism. To steal from many is research.

9. I didn’t say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you.

10. In filling out an application, where it says, ‘In case of emergency, Notify’, I put ‘DOCTOR’.

11. Women will never be equal to men until they can walk down the street with a bald head and a beer gut and still think they are sexy.
(Ever been to WAL MART?)

12. You do not need a parachute to skydive. You only need a parachute to skydive twice.

13. I used to be indecisive. Now I’m not so sure.

14. To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target.

15. Going to church doesn’t make you a Christian any more than standing in a garage makes you a car.

16. You’re never too old to learn something stupid.

17. I’m supposed to respect my elders, but its getting harder and harder for me to find one now.

Well on that note…….
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Wordsmith Wednesday- Fair Isle Knitting

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As I am having something of a knitting frenzy at the moment I was thinking where Fair Isle Knitting originated from. So here goes……

Fair Isle Knitting

Fair Isle (technique) Fair Isle jumper done in the traditional style, from Fair Isle. Fair Isle is a traditional knitting technique used to create patterns with multiple colours. It is named after Fair Isle, a tiny island in the north of Scotland, that forms part of the Shetland islands.

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Wordsmith Wednesday-Twill

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Wordsmith Wednesday is a short weekly blog post that aims to define a word a week. I try to choose a “crafty” or “vintagey” associated word ( I don’t think that vintagey is a real word!) It may broaden your vocabulary or widen your word knowledge, or maybe just fun!

Twill  is a type of textile weave with a pattern of diagonal parallel ribs (in contrast with a satin and plain weave). This is done by passing the weft thread over one or more warp threads and then under two or more warp threads and so on, with a “step” or offset between rows to create the characteristic diagonal pattern. Because of this structure, twills generally drape well.

Examples of twill fabric are denim, tweed, chino, gabardine, drill, covert, and serge.

Wordsmith Wednesday – Artisan

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An artisan (from French: artisan, Italian: artigiano) is a skilled craft worker who makes or creates things by hand that may be functional or strictly decorative, for example furniture, decorative arts, sculptures, clothing, jewellery, household items and tools or even mechanical mechanisms such as the handmade clockwork movement of a watchmaker. Artisans practice a craft and may through experience and aptitude reach the expressive levels of an artist.

During the Middle Ages, the term “artisan” was applied to those who made things or provided services. It did not apply to unskilled manual labourers. Artisans were divided into two distinct groups: those who operated their own businesses and those who did not. Those who owned their businesses were called masters, while the latter were the journeymen and apprentices. One misunderstanding many people have about this social group is that they picture them as “workers” in the modern sense: employed by someone. The most influential group among the artisans were the masters, the business owners. The owners enjoyed a higher social status in their communities.

many thanks to Wikipaedia for the above.

WordPress Wednesday- Warp and Weft

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Warp and Weft are commonly used terms amongst my crafty friends but maybe they are words that other, none crafters, may not know. 

Warp and weft in plain weaving
In weaving cloth, the warp is the set of lengthwise yarns that are held in tension on a frame or loom. The yarn that is inserted over-and-under the warp threads is called the weft, woof, or filler. Each individual warp thread in a fabric is called a warp end or end. Warp means “that which is thrown across” (Old English wearp, from weorpan, to throw, cf. German werfen, Dutch werpen).

Very simple looms use a spiral warp, in which a single, very long yarn is wound around a pair of sticks or beams in a spiral pattern to make up the warp.

Because the warp is held under high tension during the entire process of weaving and warp yarn must be strong, yarn for warp ends is usually spun and plied fibre. Traditional fibres for warping are wool, linen, alpaca, and silk. With the improvements in spinning technology during the Industrial Revolution, it became possible to make cotton yarn of sufficient strength to be used as the warp in mechanized weaving. Later, artificial or man-made fibres such as nylon or rayon were employed.

While most people are familiar with weft-faced weavings, it is possible to create warp-faced weavings using densely arranged warp threads. In warp-faced weavings, the design for the textile is in the warp, and so all colours must be decided upon and placed during the first part of the weaving process and cannot be changed. Warp-faced weavings are defined by length-wise stripes and vertical designs due to the limitations of color placement. Many South American cultures, including the ancient Incas and Aymaras used a type of warp-faced weaving called Backstrap Weaving, which uses the weight of the weaver’s body to control the tension of the loom.

Mary Kurtz Sewing Quote

Something to make you smile😃

Wordsmith Wednesday-Vintage vs Retro

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Vintage vs Retro

There are many definitions of vintage and retro but I think that the following is the simplest.

1) Too old to be considered modern, but not old enough to be considered antique. Often used to describe items for sale online such as ebay auctions or craigslist posts though may also be found in printed listings such as classified ads. Can also be a euphemism for “heavily used” items.

2) Retro, recently out of style with potential to make a comeback

I describe myself as vintage but was thinking of myself has maturing like a fine wine!  Vintage was originally a word prefixing the year of a bottle of fine wine but has become a word used to describe older items frequently offered for sale. I’m not so sure of applying the euphemism suggested above! But it’s all good fun! Perhaps I’m more retro than vintage?

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WordPress Wednesday, Campervan vs Motorhome

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We are currently away in our campervan or is it a Motorhome?

The term motorhome is sometimes used interchangeably with campervan, but the former can also be a larger vehicle than a campervan and intended to be more comfortable, whilst the latter is more concerned with ease of movement and lower cost. For example, some campervans lack built-in toilets and showers, or a divide between the living compartment and the cab.

Our campervan has all modern conveniences and we love it!

imageThe young lady is gorgeous step Grand daughter and the green tent is the dogs kennel!

Wordsmith Wednesday

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word·smith
n. 
1. A fluent and prolific writer, especially one who writes professionally.
2. An expert on words.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Until I retired I worked in a busy Radiology/imaging department. Many “words” passed through this office and it was an unwritten rule that if we had to ask how to spell a word, we were to look it up in a dictionary. This meant that not only did we spell it correctly but we qualified the definition. We therefore improved our vocabulary and spelling. This is one thing that I miss from work. I decided that every Wednesday we would investigate a “new” word.

There are no real rules regarding “Wordsmith Wednesday” except

1) The word must be interesting, uncommon, or unusual.

2) I will check both the definition and the spelling

3) There are no rules!

Dont forget to visit next Wordsmith Wednesday next Wednesday!👍