Tag Archives: garden

Chartwell and Churchill

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Today was spent visiting the home of Winston Churchill at Chartwell.

The house was interesting and situated within lovely gardens. We pic nicked in the gardens and learnt about Winston Churchill his life and political background. He was originally a Liberal MP then joined the Conservative party returned to the Liberals and then became a Conservative Prime Minister! He obviously had many many other wonderful achievements, not least the Nobel Prize for literature ! What an amazing life.

 

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Terrarium

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Terrarium

imageMy annual attempt at gardening happened this week! I don’t have a garden just tubs, plant pots and countryside. I do have a lovely glass globe that I recently rescued from a life full of sea shells and converted it into a terrarium.

I assembled the succulent plants, potting compost and a few remaining shells. Planted up the glass globe and voila a terrarium!

Time will tell how successful it will be so watch this space. In the meantime…..

 

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Wordsmith Wednesday – Blackberry vs Bramble

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imageThe blackberry is a bramble

In British English, a “bramble” is any rough (usually wild) tangled prickly shrub—specifically the blackberry bush (Rubus fruticosus)—or any hybrid of similar appearance, with thorny stems. Bramble or brambleberry may also refer to the blackberry fruit or products of its fruit (e.g., bramble jelly). The shrub grows abundantly in all parts of the British Isles and harvesting the fruits in late summer and autumn is often considered a favourite pastime. It can also become a nuisance in gardens, sending down its strong suckering roots amongst hedges and shrubs.

Elsewhere, such as in the United States, the term “bramble” also refers to other members of the Rubus genus, which may or may not have prickly stems—notably the raspberry (Rubus idaeus) or its hybrids. The word comes from Germanic bram-bezi.

Bramble bushes have a distinctive growth form. They send up long, arching canes that do not flower or set fruit until the second year of growth. Brambles usually have trifoliate or palmately-compound leaves.

Bramble fruits are aggregate fruits. Each small unit is called a drupelet. In some, such as the blackberry, the flower receptacle is elongated and part of the ripe fruit, making the blackberry an aggregate-accessory fruit.

Many species are grown and bred for their fruit. Ornamental species can be grown for flowers (e.g. Rubus trilobus), for their ornamental stems (e.g. Rubus cockburnianus) and some as ground cover (e.g. Rubus tricolor). Members of the Rubus genus tend to have a brittle, porous core and an oily residue along the stalk which makes them ideal to burn, even in damp climates. The thorny varieties are sometimes grown for game cover and occasionally for protection.

Most species are important for their conservation and wildlife value in their native range. The flowers attract nectar-feeding butterflies and hoverflies, and are a particular favourite of Volucella pellucens.

Brambles are important food plants for the larvae of several species of Lepidoptera—see list of Lepidoptera that feed on Rubus. The leaves of brambles are often used as a main food source for captive stick insects. Many birds, such as the common blackbird, and some mammals will feed on the nutritious fruits in autumn.

Home Sweet Home

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I returned home yesterday to be greeted by a wonderful display of a Clematis by my door. This plant is in a tub as I have a tiny yard. It is blooming marvellous and a lovely greeting home. Whilst I have a tiny outdoor space with my cottage I only need to take twenty steps and I am in the most beautiful countryside of the Clwydian Hills, this is my garden. Below is the view from one of my upstairs windows. Love it!

Damnvan is having a rest (and a thorough clean) before we trundle off again. Got to do the washing, catch up with family and restock the van fridge. We were planning our next trip whilst driving home but not sure of which direction we will be heading yet.

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Today I visited a Charity shop to seek out treasures. I found a lovely Ainsley bud vase to add to my ever growing collection of vintage China.

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A Day Out with Mum

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imageThe garden centre where we had our day out is called “Bents” near Warrington. I had thought that I would buy another orchid to add to my collection ( of two! ) but it seemed silly when I am going away for a chunk of the summer, and would probably kill it with kindness anyhow!

One of the Garden centre displays but I won’t be cycling far on this bike!

imageThis particular Garden centre has a HUGE craft shop. It sells nearly everything that you could want from a crafting point of view. I was extremely good and kept my purse in my bag all the way round. It’s really nice taking Mum to these places as she immediately talks about what to make, or what she has made. She’s nearly 89 and forgets the recent past but is really good about the distant past! These outings are good for her as she can still tell me what to do! Some things never change.

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Oh such lovely yarn! Gorgeous colours! Squidgy touchy textiles! Love it!

Apple Festival

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We attended an Apple Festival at Erdigg as a birthday treat for me!!! The weather was beautiful, cold, crisp and Autumnal. We took a pic nic. played rolly polly down hills and melted marshmallow over a bonfire. Erdigg is a National Trust house near to Wrexham in North Wales. The apple display was awesome. I didn’t  realise that there are so many apple varieties, but we came home with bags of bargain apples.

The walled garden is lovely but I adore walled gardens. So mellow, warm and lush. The autumn colours are stunning with golden red foliage.  Truly a season of “mists and mellow fruitfulness” I had a lovely birthday treat and am grateful to have made it this far!image image image image image image