Tag Archives: friend

Mother love and Note Books

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My friend K knitted this shawl. It’s warm and cuddly with shaped shoulders. You can also fasten the front ties if you wish. My Mum was delighted when I gave it to her. She’s not in the best of health so couldn’t do a “twirl” to take the photo from another angle. The really lovely thing was her smile when she cuddled into the shawl.

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I have also been dabbling in making note books. My first attempt, the prototype has a green suede cover which is great.

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My second attempt has a woollen cloth cover which was a free sample.I have used recycled papers for the inserts and the tie ribbon was cut from inside a sweater ( those that always annoy and show at the shoulders.) The button fasten was free on a craft magazine! So no cost.  I hope that by the third attempt I will be a note book know it all!

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Wordsmith Wednesday-Tunisian Crochet

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Technically I suppose this is Wordsmith Thursday but I am totally mixed up with holidays, mobile WIFI and adorable grandchildren!

This definition reminds me of a course that I did with my friend Penny. We never stopped laughing which I suppose is why I still can’t do Tunisian Crochet! Thanks to Wikipedia for the following.

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Tunisian crochet, also known as Afghan crochet, is a type of crochet that uses an elongated hook, often with a stopper on the handle end, called an Afghan hook. It is sometimes considered to be a mixture of crocheting and knitting. As such, some techniques used in knitting are also applicable in Tunisian crochet. One example is the intarsia method.

The work is begun with the traditional starting chain, a series of slip stitches. Once the chain is completed, the first row is worked by inserting the hook back into the previous link of the chain, and a loop from the free end of the yarn is grabbed with the hook and pulled back through the link. Unlike traditional crochet, however, this new loop is not then pulled through the initial loop. Both remain on the hook and then the process is repeated, working from right to left, until each link in the chain has been worked. At the end, there will be as many loops on the hook as there are stitches required. This process is called casting on. This is the first of two parts for creating a row.

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The work is never turned. Once the correct number of loops is obtained, the process is reversed with each loop being worked off from the hook by pulling a fresh loop of yarn through each stitch, working from left to right. It is both parts of the process which form a completed row. The tension of the yarn is much looser than in standard crochet or knitting.

Wordsmith Wednesday – Pointelle

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Pointelle

A friend gave me a knitting pattern of a jumper labelled “Pointelle”. Neither of us knew what this meant so I turned to “Mr Google” for help!

Pointelle is a delicate-looking fabric that is woolen or knitted and has little eyelet holes to create the appearance of lace. The fabric used for a feminine, delicate-looking knitted shirt with little eyelet holes that make the shirt look lacy is an example of pointelle.

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Wordsmith Wednesday-Tunisian Crochet

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Tunisian Crochet

I chose Tunisian Crochet for this weeks WordPress Wednesday because it takes me back to a course that I did in Chester with my friend Penny. It was such good fun and we still giggle about to this day. Happy times!

Tunisian crochet, also known as Afghan crochet, is a type of crochet that uses an elongated hook, often with a stopper on the handle end, called an Afghan hook. It is sometimes considered to be a mixture of crocheting and knitting. As such, some techniques used in knitting are also applicable in Tunisian crochet. One example is the intarsia method.

The work is begun with the traditional starting chain, a series of slip stitches. Once the chain is completed, the first row is worked by inserting the hook back into the previous link of the chain, and a loop from the free end of the yarn is grabbed with the hook and pulled back through the link. Unlike traditional crochet, however, this new loop is not then pulled through the initial loop. Both remain on the hook and then the process is repeated, working from right to left, until each link in the chain has been worked. At the end, there will be as many loops on the hook as there are stitches required. This process is called casting on. This is the first of two parts for creating a row.

The work is never turned. Once the correct number of loops is obtained, the process is reversed with each loop being worked off from the hook by pulling a fresh loop of yarn through each stitch, working from left to right. It is both parts of the process which form a completed row. The tension of the yarn is much looser than in standard crochet or knitting.p

Tunisian crochet can also be worked in the round, as when making a seamless cap. To work in the round a double-ended crochet hook and two balls of yarn are used. The first hook and ball of yarn are used to add loops (casting on). When the process is reversed (as described above), the loops are worked off using the second hook and second ball of yarn. Using a flexible cable to connect the two ends of the double-ended crochet hook, a single ball of yarn is sufficient.

There are a variety of stitches than can be created, dependent on how and where the hook is inserted and how the working yarn is held. Tunisian stitches include variations on knit, purl, post stitch, and entrelac, to name a few.

The fabric created by Tunisian crochet is slightly less elastic than normal crochet and substantially thicker, particularly the knit stitch. This makes it most suitable for blankets and winter knits, but unsuitable for finer items like babywear and socks. The fabric also has a tendency to curl, and usually needs to be shaped by wetting or steaming the fabric (known as blocking) upon completion. It is slightly faster to create fabric by Tunisian than normal crochet, and approximately twice the speed of knitting.

Thanks to Wikipedia for the above.

American Sour Dough Bread (attempt)

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Risen dough

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Fresh from the oven

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Sliced Bread

A friend gave me an American sour dough culture last week. I have nurtured this “living being” with much love and great care. I have fed it with specially purchased bread flour and stirred it carefully as instructed. Yesterday was THE day and I made the loaf. I left it to prove overnight when it rose so much it nearly took over the kitchen! OK I am prone to a little exaggeration!

Today a kneeded the thing again and left it to prove for a second time. Now at this point I should have been worried as it didn’t re-rise. I eventually put it into the oven at the correct temperature, I think. In due course I removed the baked loaf and it looked lovely if a little flat…..

The real problem started when I tried to cut the beast. I needed a hacksaw! I did taste it but was in fear of expensive dental treatment. It would make a great frisbee, or a weight for excercising, or a stone for my rock garden but not such a great sandwich. Ah well! I tried! Oops! I’ve just blocked the drain with the remaining culture! Help!!!!

Weekend, Wine and Winter

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This week end I am away in the Yorkshire days with four other girl friends. The location is gorgeous and the weather is dreadful. Still all is good with the World as we are ably assisted by sparkling white wine! We are staying in a converted Chapel which is lovely but incredibly hard to heat up! One of our “team” has just had foot surgery and is resting with her foot up and pain killers and red wine ( not recommended!). Another of our “group” has given up cake for Lent -of which we have lots, so has substituted biscuits! There is no mobile phone coverage but we have WIFI -bizarre! We have been unable to light a fire in the wood burner due to our inadequate fire lighting skills. I purchased a lovely Herdy mug and dropped it as I came out of the shop. But all in all we are having a good time. Oh and it snowed last night.

We are staying in a village called Bainbridge close to Hawes in the Yorkshire Dales. On a short walk this afternoon we crossed a bridge over the River Bain and saw an Archimedes Screw. This is a community project to create Hydro electricity for the National Grid amazing for such a small community and really interesting!

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