Tag Archives: cloth

Wordsmith Wednesday-Worsted

Standard

Worsted

This word has always confused me! Thank you to Wikipedia for this info.

According to the Craft Yarn Council, the term “Worsted Weight”, also known as “Afghan”, “Aran”, or simply “Medium”, refers to a particular weight of yarn that produces a gauge of 16-20 stitches per 4 inches of stockinette, and is best knitted with 4.5mm to 5.5mm needles (US size 7-9).

Worsted wool fabric is typically used in the making of tailored garments such as suits, as opposed to woollen wool which is used for knitted items such as sweaters

The essential feature of worsted yarn is straight, parallel fibres. Originally, long, fine staple wool was spun to create worsted yarn; today, other long fibres are also used.

Many spinners differentiate between worsted preparation and worsted spinning. Worsted preparation refers to the way the fibre is prepared before spinning, using ginning machines which force the fibre staples to lie parallel to each other. Once these fibres have been made into a top, they are then combed to remove the short fibres. The long fibres are combined in subsequent gilling machines to again make the fibres parallel. This produces overlapping untwisted strands called slivers. Worsted spinning refers to using a worsted technique, which produces a smooth yarn in which the fibres lie parallel.imageExamples of Worsted Wool

Advertisements

Wordsmith Wednesday-Twill

Standard

Wordsmith Wednesday is a short weekly blog post that aims to define a word a week. I try to choose a “crafty” or “vintagey” associated word ( I don’t think that vintagey is a real word!) It may broaden your vocabulary or widen your word knowledge, or maybe just fun!

Twill  is a type of textile weave with a pattern of diagonal parallel ribs (in contrast with a satin and plain weave). This is done by passing the weft thread over one or more warp threads and then under two or more warp threads and so on, with a “step” or offset between rows to create the characteristic diagonal pattern. Because of this structure, twills generally drape well.

Examples of twill fabric are denim, tweed, chino, gabardine, drill, covert, and serge.

WordPress Wednesday- Warp and Weft

Standard

Warp and Weft are commonly used terms amongst my crafty friends but maybe they are words that other, none crafters, may not know. 

Warp and weft in plain weaving
In weaving cloth, the warp is the set of lengthwise yarns that are held in tension on a frame or loom. The yarn that is inserted over-and-under the warp threads is called the weft, woof, or filler. Each individual warp thread in a fabric is called a warp end or end. Warp means “that which is thrown across” (Old English wearp, from weorpan, to throw, cf. German werfen, Dutch werpen).

Very simple looms use a spiral warp, in which a single, very long yarn is wound around a pair of sticks or beams in a spiral pattern to make up the warp.

Because the warp is held under high tension during the entire process of weaving and warp yarn must be strong, yarn for warp ends is usually spun and plied fibre. Traditional fibres for warping are wool, linen, alpaca, and silk. With the improvements in spinning technology during the Industrial Revolution, it became possible to make cotton yarn of sufficient strength to be used as the warp in mechanized weaving. Later, artificial or man-made fibres such as nylon or rayon were employed.

While most people are familiar with weft-faced weavings, it is possible to create warp-faced weavings using densely arranged warp threads. In warp-faced weavings, the design for the textile is in the warp, and so all colours must be decided upon and placed during the first part of the weaving process and cannot be changed. Warp-faced weavings are defined by length-wise stripes and vertical designs due to the limitations of color placement. Many South American cultures, including the ancient Incas and Aymaras used a type of warp-faced weaving called Backstrap Weaving, which uses the weight of the weaver’s body to control the tension of the loom.

Mary Kurtz Sewing Quote

Something to make you smile😃

Sew and sew!

Standard

In my wisdom I decided to “return to sewing”. Yes I have always sewn but in the recent past I’ve sewed stuff such as cushions, soft furnishings, rag dolls, quilts etc. it’s many years since I’ve sewn garments. Not exactly Haute Couture but basic dress making such as dresses,skirts, tops etc. For my first (in modern times) foray into dressmaking I chose a skirt pattern. I tried to keep it simple whilst being reasonably on trend. How wrong can you be!

In the past I have made wedding dresses, many evening dresses, children’s clothes etc but this must be about thirty years ago. My how the memory dulls! I chose a Burda pattern to start with (Burda style 6835).

image

FIRST PROBLEM

Fabric! I chose a lovely woollen plaid cloth. Not too expensive, but I purchased twice as much as required. Lesson learned = buy the pattern before the fabric, for reasons of economy.

SECOND PROBLEM

Check the size. This pattern is in American sizing so I had a problem converting my generous size 16 into the American equivalent! Because I am lining the skirt I cut out and pinned the back of the skirt and measured it against another skirt that fits nicely. Not exactly scientific but hopefully it will work.

Lesson learned = either lose weight or check the pattern sizing!

THIRD PROBLEM

Terminology! What on earth is the Godet piece? Still not sure but maybe time will tell!

Do dressmakers still use Tailors tacks? Is basting the same as tacking? How do you insert a full length zip that is for show only?

Lesson learned = Read the Instructions- simple when you know how!

I will let you know how I muddle through! Pictures included, promise.