Category Archives: knitting

Knitting moan.

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I’m still “dust busting” It’s amazing how having friends to dinner can motivate you to clean your house! That and the dusty remains of a new boiler installation. But even better news! I’ve finally got back to working on my own projects! Maybe I will even finish something.

IMG_1326I was traumatised to find an error on my Miriam pattern from Quince and co. It was only when I reached all the way to the sleeve insertion that I realised the error. The pattern instructions shape at the “sides” as this is knit in one piece. However whilst it does state 4 sts dec’d the instructions only decrease by 2 stitches. When I enquired I was just informed that I must be using an earlier edition of the pattern and subsequent editions had been amended. Well I don’t think that is good enough. Patterns should be fully tested before publishing. I have had to pull back hours of work which is so demoralising. Still lesson learned….. don’t buy un checked patterns from the Internet!

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Another Project

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The best thing about completing a project is that you can start another one! Having completed Darling daughters shrug I have now started a scarf! Not too difficult. This scarf is a little different and goes under the name of “Hitchhiker”. It is a pattern by Martina Behm and can be found and bought from Ravelry.com I am working it in a Superwash Marino 4ply yarn called Vivacious by Fyberpates

IMG_1043I also keep dipping into my multi coloured stash buster blanket.

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Knitting on the Needles

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Well the current project is growing reasonably quickly. This has been helped along by going to craft group today and knitting for two solid hours. Plus I took it along with me when I visited my Mum yesterday. Mum used to be a great knitter and craft woman. I was showing her my work in progress when she explained that knitting “had left her”. I know exactly what she means and I think at nearly 90 years old this is hardly surprising! I’m just happy that she knit and sewed all my younger life. I think that this has instilled the desire to craft in me. So it’s onwards and upwards I go knitting, sewing, reducing stash, buying more stash and generally enjoying crafting.

I am a little disappointed with how dark this garment is turning out. For some unknown reason I thought that it was a more silver grey! Still maybe when teamed up with a bright colour it will look ok! Bring on pink or yellow or bright blue or all three!

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Knitting near Mevagissey

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Megavissey Harbour

I drove along the coast to visit Mevagissey, a fishing village not far away. The village has narrow streets, old fishing cottages and a small, busy harbour. It was also heaving with visitors. Now that’s a bit selfish as obviously I’m a visitor too! But I had forgotten that today (Monday) is a Bank Holiday and lots of people have the day out and about. I tend to loose touch with reality when I am away with Damnvan and think that everywhere is peaceful, quiet and picturesque, and it’s not!

Anyhow, we joined the hoards and ate a Cornish pastie on the quayside, whilst dodging hungry seagulls. This is my first and probably last Cornish Pastie of this trip.

By the end of the 18th century the pasty was the staple diet of working men across Cornwall. Miners and farm workers took this portable and easy to eat convenience food with them to work because it was so well suited to the purpose. Its size and shape made it easy to carry, its pastry case insulated the contents and was durable enough to survive, while its wholesome ingredients provided enough sustenance to see the workers through their long and arduous working days.

By the early 20th century the Cornish Pasty was produced on a large scale throughout the county as a basic food for farm workers and miners

There are hundreds of stories about the evolution of the pasty’s shape, with the most popular being that the D-shape enabled tin miners to re-heat them underground as well as eat them safely. The crust (crimped edge) was used as a handle which was then discarded due to the high levels of arsenic in many of the tin mines.

I didn’t stay too long and drove away from the maddening crowd back to the peaceful campsite. I now have a lovely sunny afternoon to finish my knitting, blog and generally relax. Lovely!

A Walk Around Derwntwater

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 imageWe are camped on the edge of beautiful Derwentwater, Cumbria. Itis a beautiful location looking over the lake towards the Fells. The weather is cool and crisp with gorgeous Autumnal colours. We have dodged heavy rain at night when we are cosy in Damnvan1.

This is the time when I indulge my need to craft, knit, read  and play on line scrabble! I am still working on Mum’s Christmas present of a shawl.( I’m OK to go public as she will definately NOT read this blog!) The shawl,or wrap, feels like something of a monster at the moment and has taken on a life of its own. I think that this is because I’m on the last leg and the last few inches always seem to take the longest. Anyway if everything else fails I know that it has been knit with great love.

Benji dog really enjoys the outdoor life. Actually he is really frightened of the visiting geese who arrive  every morning. They are enjoying the fallen apples for breakfast each day.