Summer Solstice

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A solstice is an astronomical event that occurs twice each year (in June and December) as the Sun reaches its highest or lowest excursion relative to the celestial equator on the celestial sphere. Both the solstices and the equinoxes are directly connected with the seasons of the year.

The word solstice is derived from the Latin sol (sun) and sistere (to stand still), because at the solstices, the Sun stands still in declination; that is, the seasonal movement of the Sun’s path (as seen from Earth) comes to a stop before reversing direction.

Stargazers are hoping to catch the first glimpse of a Strawberry Moon on the same day as the summer solstice for almost 50 years.

A Strawberry Moon is not necessarily pink or red, however.

It is simply a name given to the full moon each June, which coincides with the start of the strawberry season.

But it has not happened on the longest day of the year since 1967 – and astrologers are excited to see the two coincide this year.

The name was coined by Native American tribes who used it as a signal to gather ripening strawberries.

It became known in Europe as the Full Rose Moon, and the Honey Moon.

Yesterday Chester celebrated the Summer Solstice with a parade through the city centre. My youngest Grandson took part with his class from school. He really enjoyed it. Lots of people had made a huge effort from the wonderful to the weird. There were Giants and Dragons, Angels and sunshine. All of this had beautiful Chester architecture and the wonderful cathedral as the backdrop.

May the summer days bring you all blessings in every way.

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